The impact of music therapy versus music medicine on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients

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      Lesley
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      The impact of music therapy versus music medicine on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients: a mixed methods study

      Authors: Joke Bradt , Noah Potvin, Amy Kesslick, Minjung Shim, Donna Radl, Emily Schriver, Edward J. Gracely, Lydia T. Komarnicky-Kocher

      Supportive Care in Cancer

      May 2015, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 1261-1271

      Abstract

      Purpose

      The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of music therapy (MT) versus music medicine (MM) interventions on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients and to enhance understanding of patients’ experiences of these two types of music interventions.

      Methods

      This study employed a mixed methods intervention design in which qualitative data were embedded within a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty-one adult cancer patients participated in two sessions that involved interactive music making with a music therapist (MT) and two sessions in which they listened to pre-recorded music without the presence of a therapist (MM). Before and after each session, participants reported on their mood, anxiety, relaxation, and pain by means of visual analogue and numeric rating scales. Thirty participants completed an exit interview.

      Results

      The quantitative data suggest that both interventions were equally effective in enhancing target outcomes. However, 77.4 % of participants expressed a preference for MT sessions. The qualitative data indicate that music improves symptom management, embodies hope for survival, and helps connect to a pre-illness self, but may also access memories of loss and trauma. MT sessions helped participants tap into inner resources such as playfulness and creativity. Interactive music making also allowed for emotional expression. Some participants preferred the familiarity and predictability of listening to pre-recorded music.

      Conclusions

      The findings of this study advocate for the use of music in cancer care. Treatment benefits may depend on patient characteristics such as outlook on life and readiness to explore emotions related to the cancer experience.

      http://0-dx.doi.org.aupac.lib.athabascau.ca/10.1007/s00520-014-2478

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